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What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?

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sid

What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« on: July 24, 2017, 04:52:50 PM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

Optimus Prime

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2017, 09:35:23 PM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

That's a fiqh question, that should be addressed to the 'Ulema of fiqh.

sid

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2017, 05:52:00 AM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

That's a fiqh question, that should be addressed to the 'Ulema of fiqh.

no its not,i just meant to ask you first feelings when you stopped praying the shia way and prayed the sunni way.

Hadrami

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2017, 12:29:46 PM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

That's a fiqh question, that should be addressed to the 'Ulema of fiqh.

no its not,i just meant to ask you first feelings when you stopped praying the shia way and prayed the sunni way.
i dont think hes a former shia.Just wait for others, prob bit busy rite now

MuslimK

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Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2017, 03:20:28 PM »
Lets wait for the ex-Shia members to reply.
در خلافت میل نیست ای بی‌خبر
میل کی آید ز بوبکر و عمر
میل اگر بودی در آن دو مقتدا
هر دو کردندی پسر را پیشوا

عطار نِیشابوری

www.Nahjul-Balagha.net | www.TwelverShia.net | www.ghadirkhumm.com

Abu Ammar

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2017, 04:14:15 PM »
Asalamu alaykum,

When I was Shia, I always admired how Sunnis emphasised the importance of Salah, and further, Salat Jama'ah. I didn't feel the same vibe with Shia Masajid, especially when some don't even open on Fridays or only open on particular events, in contrast to Sunni Masajid which open everyday for all 5 Salahs and for Jama'ah. My mother, who is over 50 years old and has been to Hajj on several occasions, told me once she 'still doesn't know how to pray in Jama'ah', this is due to the neglect of praying Salah in a group.

With regards to physical changes, I first folded my arms when I was a (very reformed) Shia who had a profound desire to pray Jama'ah with Sunnis. The reason why I done this was more symbolic; to confirm with myself and Allah that I'm with those who pray the Jama'ah on time. The feeling I had was of acceptance, not by the community, but by Allah himself, that I was able to worship him in the best way possible. Having said that, I still prayed on a turbah.

Months later, I rejected Shi'ism. However did not become Sunni yet as I was still looking into Madhahib. But the next time I prayed in Jama'ah, without a turbah, it was almost like relief - like this is more suited to what I am.

I also said 'Ameen' after Al Fatiha, which was something I've always wanted to do. I understand desire is not a reason for why one should do something, yet I've wanted to say 'Ameen' because it's what I outwardly see when the Jama'ah pray, and I wanted to be a part of it. Maybe I came to realise at one point that the truth must be with those who pray in congregation properly, which wasn't what I saw in the Shia community. In fact, when I asked my Shia friends to pray in Jama'ah, sometimes they'd refuse! This is due to a lack of emphasis, Sunnis would never refuse such a delightful offer.

So I guess the answer to your question is that it depends on why one becomes Sunni. I'm more motivated to pray my Salahs as a Sunni because then I feel like a true part of the Ummah, however the experience may be different for others.

والله اعلم

« Last Edit: July 25, 2017, 04:18:29 PM by Abu Ammar »
لا تعتقد دين الروافض إنهم أهل المحال وحزبة الشيطان

'Do not Believe [in] the religion of the Rawafidh, for they are people of distortion and the party of Satan'

Nooniyah Al-Qahtani

Abu Ammar

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2017, 04:17:36 PM »
I understand you weren't asking about congregation, however the catalyst for my change was due to congregational prayers. I hope I've made the point clear.
لا تعتقد دين الروافض إنهم أهل المحال وحزبة الشيطان

'Do not Believe [in] the religion of the Rawafidh, for they are people of distortion and the party of Satan'

Nooniyah Al-Qahtani

sid

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2017, 06:10:27 PM »
I understand you weren't asking about congregation, however the catalyst for my change was due to congregational prayers. I hope I've made the point clear.

no no brother, you answered my question perfectly, JazakAllah

Hani

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2017, 03:53:39 AM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

As a Sunni, just so that you know, you can pray without folding your hands, you can also restrict yourself to praying on pebbles/soil since this was also a Madhab for a few early Sunni scholars. However, leaving aside these tiny Fiqhi differences, congregational prayers in a Sunni Masjid will feel heavenly and much more spiritual than anything you can imagine.
عَلامَةُ أَهْلِ الْبِدَعِ الْوَقِيعَةُ فِي أَهْلِ الأَثَرِ. وَعَلامَةُ الْجَهْمِيَّةِ أَنْ يُسَمُّوا أَهْلَ السُّنَّةِ مُشَبِّهَةً. وَعَلامَةُ الْقَدَرِيَّةِ أَنْ يُسَمُّوا أَهْلَ السُّنَّةِ مُجَبِّرَةً. وَعَلامَةُ الزَّنَادِقَةِ أَنْ يُسَمُّوا أَهْلَ الأَثَرِ حَشْوِيَّةً

Religion = simple & clear

Farid

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2017, 04:59:43 PM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

As a Sunni, just so that you know, you can pray without folding your hands, you can also restrict yourself to praying on pebbles/soil since this was also a Madhab for a few early Sunni scholars.

I would just like to point out that early Sunnis would pray on the ground due to their piety, not because they believed it was an obligation to pray on soil.

Hani

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2017, 06:33:31 PM »
I recall reading in one Maliki book that it's out of humbleness. I didn't read anywhere that they viewed the alternative as forbidden, it seems to be they restricted themselves out of personal preference not for any specific religious ruling.
عَلامَةُ أَهْلِ الْبِدَعِ الْوَقِيعَةُ فِي أَهْلِ الأَثَرِ. وَعَلامَةُ الْجَهْمِيَّةِ أَنْ يُسَمُّوا أَهْلَ السُّنَّةِ مُشَبِّهَةً. وَعَلامَةُ الْقَدَرِيَّةِ أَنْ يُسَمُّوا أَهْلَ السُّنَّةِ مُجَبِّرَةً. وَعَلامَةُ الزَّنَادِقَةِ أَنْ يُسَمُّوا أَهْلَ الأَثَرِ حَشْوِيَّةً

Religion = simple & clear

Ebn Hussein

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2017, 04:43:48 AM »
What was it like praying the sunni way for the first time, not in congregation i mean, but the different procedures, the folding of hands, praying without the turbah,the different words etc. did it feel different or was it the same feeling even when you used to pray shia way. Also when did you start learning to pray the sunni way. Is it allowed if i still pray the shia way? these are questions i think a lot about.

Well, as for myself, I personally, due to extensive research in Arabic, believe and practice the following things ever since I left Shiism (aftwards I will get to my experience):

- Al-Sadl and Al-Qabdh (letting the arms hang and holding them in prayer) are BOTH from the Sunnah. I am not a mujtahid, what I am saying is what early big guns of Sunnism said, Ibn Abdil-Barr, the giant of Malikism hold that opinion and I myself pray sometimes sadl and sometimes with qabdh, both ways are beautiful and I strongly believe the Prophet (saws) prayed both ways (and I respect the opinion of those who either argue that one method was later abrogated). It is not a Shia thing, I have no doubt that some Salaf prayed in sadl (there is reports).

- Saying 'alayhissalam etc. for Ahl Al-Bayt AND Sahabah is permissible, ironically the Hanbali madhab is very open minded in this issue. It's not a Shia thing, the mutaqaddimeen of the Sunnis used 'alayhissalam for Ahl Al-Bayt AND Sahabah (Shias will only refer to the Ahl Al-Bayt bits, obviously ...), I myself use both and have written a number of articles on this issue alone onbrother Efendi's - also an Ex-Shia - Gift2Shias blog: https://gift2shias.com/category/salawat-issue-sending-salam-on-sahabaahl-al-bayt-etc/

- Saying Salawat on Muhammad and Aal Muhammad in Sujud. It's barely practiced and ironically the likes of Shaikh Al-Albani ("Nasibi" authority) pushed people in his lectures to send Salawat on Muhammad and Aal Muhammad after EVERY du'a, anywhere, including in Salah, as it is from the aadaab of du'ah to start with prasing Allah then finishing with Salah on Muhammad and Aal Muhammad, عليهم السلام). For example (in sujud): "Subhaana Rabbiyal-A3laa wa bi7amdi, Allahummaaghfirli wali walidaini, Allahummma Salli wa sallam 3ala sayyidina Muhammad wa 3ala Aali Sayyidina Muhammad."

Having said that, I feel much more comfortable having abondened the Imami Shia Salah. The worst thing by far about the Shia Imami Salah (what a big irony really ...) is that they don't say the full IBRAHIMIC Salawat in ANY of their ritual prayers (I mean 5 daily ones and Nawafil), i.e. it is THEM who say incomplete Salawat on the Prophet! Let me eleborate:

Sunnis take the beautiful Salawat on the Prophet and his Aal (in PRAYER outside prayer it is not wajib to send prayers on his families, all hadith stating otherwise are fabrications and I have proven that from my articles) from a number of Sahabah, all very similar but slightly different, beautiful to memorise all. ALL Sunni Salawat in prayer include a COMPLETE Ibrahimic salawat, all of them consist of more than one line of prayer, like the following one:

Allahumma salli 'ala Muhammad, wa 'ala 'Ali Muhammad, kama sallayta 'ala ‘Ibrahim, wa 'ala 'Ali ‘Ibrahim. ‘Innaka Hamidum Majid. Allahumma barik 'ala Muhammad, wa 'ala 'Ali Muhammad, kama barakta 'ala ‘Ibrahim, wa ;ala 'Ali ‘Ibrahim. ‘Innaka Hamidum Majid.


So above you can see the Sunni salawat on the Prophet and his Aal that every Sunni recites (also narrated by the likes of "Nasibi" Ibn 'Omar son of the great "Nasibi" ''Omar ibn Al-Khattab, in the book of the 'Nasibis' Sahih Al-Bukhari ...). Can you see how long it is, how much praise it includes? Now compare it to the Rafidi Salawat in their prayer it consists of a SINGLE line:

Allahumma salli 'ala Muhammad wa Aali Muhammad


(note: I am comparing only both SALAWAT not the entire tashahhud)

A single line, an incomplete Ibrahimic prayer! It is THEM who don't pray the actual Ibrahimic salawat, not even in their daily prayers (even in their speeches you can rarely hear them reciting it). So ironically, the Sunni prayer includes more praises on Muhammad and his Aal and is hence more complete.

There is more I can tell, inshaallah in the future.
الإمام الشافعي رحمه الله
لم أر أحداً من أهل الأهواء أشهد بالزور من الرافضة! - الخطيب في الكفاية والسوطي.

Imam Al-Shafi3i - may Allah have mercy upon him - said: "I have not seen among the heretics a people more famous for falsehood than the Rafidah." [narrated by Al-Khatib Al-Baghdadi/Al-Kifayah]

Zlatan Ibrahimovic

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2017, 06:33:59 AM »
In case anybody is confused, it is mustahab to say the Ibrahimi salawat in Salat according to the Shi'a.
محور المقاومة والممانعة

Bolani Muslim

Re: What was it like for ex shia to pray the sunni way ?
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2017, 03:22:03 AM »
     I remember feeling uncomfortable the first time I performed salaah the 'Sunni way.' I have been exposed to Sunnis praying through family and family-friends, so it was not a foreign concept, but it was upsetting because I felt like a traitor to my upbringing. Most Shias have a strong group-mentality, depending on location either they genuinely are oppressed or assume their faction or Shias in the greater world are actively being oppressed by Sunnis. I felt guilty for joining the other side (somewhat like joining an enemy, though not exactly).

     Before starting to pray Sunni-style, I was becoming discontent with the 'Islam' that I was raised into, my uneasiness with the sect only intensified the greater I explored and scrutinized what I was preached alongside the tenets of Sunni Islam. For the subsequent months I inwardly believed more and more like a Sunni, but continued outwardly acting and posing as a Shia. It was heartbreaking for me to abandon my identity, but as time passed, I realized that I could no longer identify myself with a religion that I believed was implausible.

     One day I briefly researched how the details of salaah within Sunnism should be performed. The differences were not significant and I was able to memorize most of the salaah within an afternoon, however I was forced to look at my phone during tashahud for a few days. The hardest part was clasping my hands, I knew it wasn't fard, but clasping my hands was important. Performing sajda without a turba/mohr was also eerie, I preferred the sensation of the carpet, but again felt as if I had discarded my family and identity. Both performing salaah clasped and without a turba were powerful symbols, my salaah would now be considered void  according to my former faith. I felt a mix of emotions, I was tense, nervous, and disheartened, yet oddly satisfied that I finally took the first step to entering what I consider the most authentic form of Islam.

     For a long while I was concerned about the gossip of my community, but now it does not bother me as much. At home and with Shias I pray with my hands unclasped, but while I am in the masjid or in public I prefer to pray Sunni-style, qabd. Personally, prayer was the stepping-stone to how my Islamic identity transformed. Praying with clasped hands and without natural material for sajda was originally daunting, but doing so changed who I was. As Muslims we believe our salaahs are our tickets to accessing heaven and as such we regard our prayers eminently. Me being a 'noncomformist' Shia was one thing, but altering my ticket to entry into paradise to a method that is considered invalidating to Twelver-Shiaism was life-changing.

 

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