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Iranian General Qasem Suleimani Reportedly Killed in Strike at Baghdad Airport

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iceman

Shiachat is always a great forum for destroying Iranian/shia propaganda. Anyway because Khamenei likes to act as if Iran is some great fighter against America and Israel, I thought this little screenshot would help show some truth. The post is by a shiachat admin who is attempting to defend the dead Iranian general against American claims that he was responsible for American soldier deaths.



He doesn't need defending. No one heard or spoke about him till the strike. If he was a terrorist or murderer then he would have been mentioned and well known globally like Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi, Osama bin Laden or Aiman Al Zawahiri. Now those who say and yapp on that the Iranian regime doesn't have much support in Iran, are you watching the news lately. Look at the thousands out on the streets in Iran as well as Iraq.

Adil

He doesn't need defending. No one heard or spoke about him till the strike. If he was a terrorist or murderer then he would have been mentioned and well known globally like Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi, Osama bin Laden or Aiman Al Zawahiri. Now those who say and yapp on that the Iranian regime doesn't have much support in Iran, are you watching the news lately. Look at the thousands out on the streets in Iran as well as Iraq.

He was definitely known. So known that even some iraqis openly celebrated his death and oppressed syrians handed out sweets upon learning of his demise. I'm sorry you didn't know him but you aren't exactly the most aware person. The sunni world is happy about the death of this sectarian shia oppressor.

The protests against the Iranian regime had far more people lol. The protests in Iraq against the government had far more people. Who you trying to fool man?

If you think this terrorist doesn't need defending then go make an account on shiachat and tell them to stop wasting their time.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 01:17:46 AM by Adil »

iceman

Analysis for many Sunni Muslim Countries, Is Iran really a threat.
Anyone fond of dividing the Middle East into good Sunnis and evil Shias will have to explain how Pakistan is able to carry on a romance with both powers.

Thus anyone fond of dividing the Middle East into good Sunnis and evil Shias will have to explain how a Sunni state like Pakistan is able to carry on a romance with both Shia Iran and ultra-Sunni Saudi Arabia. And if this isn’t enough, he’ll also have to explain how Shia Iran maintains close relations with the Sunni Taliban in Afghanistan while also helping Afghanistan’s Sunni government.

Pakistan’s Chief of Army Staff Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa paid an unusual, “historic” visit to Tehran. The general, with numerous medals adorning his dress uniform, embraced the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps and declared that he had come to Iran in part to learn how to build and deploy volunteer militias like Iran’s Basij in his own country. The two countries also have shared economic interests, like the gas pipeline that’s supposed to run from Iran to India via Pakistan and the Russian oil pipeline that’s slated to follow a similar route.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 01:35:28 AM by iceman »

iceman

Analysis for many Sunni Muslim Countries, Is Iran really a threat.
Anyone fond of dividing the Middle East into good Sunnis and evil Shias will have to explain how Pakistan is able to carry on a romance with both powers.

Thus anyone fond of dividing the Middle East into good Sunnis and evil Shias will have to explain how a Sunni state like Pakistan is able to carry on a romance with both Shia Iran and ultra-Sunni Saudi Arabia. And if this isn’t enough, he’ll also have to explain how Shia Iran maintains close relations with the Sunni Taliban in Afghanistan while also helping Afghanistan’s Sunni government.

Pakistan’s Chief of Army Staff Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa paid an unusual, “historic” visit to Tehran. The general, with numerous medals adorning his dress uniform, embraced the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps and declared that he had come to Iran in part to learn how to build and deploy volunteer militias like Iran’s Basij in his own country. The two countries also have shared economic interests, like the gas pipeline that’s supposed to run from Iran to India via Pakistan and the Russian oil pipeline that’s slated to follow a similar route.

If Iran is such a great threat that it justifies Saudi Arabia’s crude intervention in other Mideast countries’ internal affairs – see, for example Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri’s recent resignation – then why hasn’t Riyadh imposed sanctions on Pakistan? There are two answers to that. First, Saudi Arabia needs Pakistan in its “Sunni” coalition. But no less important, for the time being, it can’t do without Pakistani workers. Lebanon, in contrast, is just a pawn.

One could pose a similar question to Riyadh about its close ties with Turkey, another economic and strategic ally of Tehran. Two years ago, Turkey joined Saudi Arabia’s Sunni alliance (after initially being ostracized by it) without being required to sever its ties with Iran – something Riyadh has demanded of Qatar, though not of the United Arab Emirates, whose trade with Iran is even more extensive. Evidently, the Saudis recognize the limits of their war against Iran.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 01:43:56 AM by iceman »

Adil

Analysis for many Sunni Muslim Countries, Is Iran really a threat.
Anyone fond of dividing the Middle East into good Sunnis and evil Shias will have to explain how Pakistan is able to carry on a romance with both powers.

Because Pakistani leaders don't care about who is evil and who is not. They care about their own worldly interests. For example China has 100,000s of Muslims locked up, yet Pakistan calls it it's 'iron brother'. So quite clearly Pakistan does not choose who to work with by looking at whether they are good or evil.

Even whilst going along with sunni-shia neutrality, the Pakistani military still provides ex-serviceman for Bahrain even though it knows that the Bahrain government will use them to crackdown on rebelling shias. It doesn't do it because it has joined up sunnis but rather again because it just meets Pakistani interests.

But worry not though, over this past year there has been a sharp increase of anti-Iran sentiment in Pakistan and Pakistani authorities have launched a crackdown on shia who work for Iran as target killers or serve it in other bad roles. So there have been improvements made in this direction. May Allah (swt) grant Pakistan a strong and religious sunni ruler.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 01:41:00 AM by Adil »

iceman

The Israeli and American satisfaction with Riyadh’s anti-Iran campaign, which depicts the Iranian threat as the principal axis around which the Middle East revolves, is misguided. This simplistic outlook primarily serves the Israeli and American need to find an ultimate enemy and build a military policy around it. But this view of the Iranian threat is not shared by all Arab states, including ones that have signed peace agreements with Israel.

Egypt, for instance, is Israel’s ally in the war against Sunni terrorist organizations in Sinai and the Gaza Strip, and it defines Hezbollah as a terrorist organization. Yet it also opposes Saudi Arabia’s aggressive stance against Iran and Hezbollah. Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shukri is visiting several Mideast countries this week in an effort to persuade Riyadh and its allies to use diplomacy rather than military threats. Egypt also “rebelled” against Saudi dictates last year when it supported a Russian United Nation resolution on Syria, to which Iran was a party, and suffered Saudi economic sanctions as a result.

As for Jordan, it is more worried about radical Sunni militias setting up shop near its border than it is about an Iranian presence in the Golan Heights. Jordan also rejected a Saudi demand that it attack forces loyal to the Assad regime on Syrian territory. It too suffered economic penalties as a result: Riyadh stopped the financial aid it had promised.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 01:47:32 AM by iceman »

Adil

The Israeli and American satisfaction with Riyadh’s anti-Iran campaign, which depicts the Iranian threat as the principal axis around which the Middle East revolves, is misguided. This simplistic outlook primarily serves the Israeli and American need to find an ultimate enemy and build a military policy around it. But this view of the Iranian threat is not shared by all Arab states, including ones that have signed peace agreements with Israel.

Egypt, for instance, is Israel’s ally in the war against Sunni terrorist organizations in Sinai and the Gaza Strip, and it defines Hezbollah as a terrorist organization. Yet it also opposes Saudi Arabia’s aggressive stance against Iran and Hezbollah. Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shukri is visiting several Mideast countries this week in an effort to persuade Riyadh and its allies to use diplomacy rather than military threats. Egypt also “rebelled” against Saudi dictates last year when it supported a Russian United Nation resolution on Syria, to which Iran was a party, and suffered Saudi economic sanctions as a result.

Why are you copy and pasting random paragraphs? It's not your work, yet you're providing no link to the original source.

Are you trying to troll-spam the thread or something?

iceman

These countries would apparently prefer to be in the same situation as Pakistan and Turkey, which have close ties with both Tehran and Riyadh and can maneuver between them based on their own national interests. But as a result of these countries’ dependence on Saudi Arabia, it seems the real threat, in their view, isn’t Iran, but the Saudi sanctions they can expect if they disobey Riyadh.

Thus the “Sunni axis” is really a “Saudi axis.” This isn’t a group of Sunni countries driven by religious hatred of a Shia country; rather, the common denominator that unites its members is their dependence on Riyadh or their desire to be its economic ally. Moreover, the claim that there’s a risk of Shia Islam spreading in Sunni states portrays Sunni countries as being weak and on the defensive – as if the sweeping Sunni majority, comprising some 90 percent of all Muslims, were actually afraid of the power of the Shia, who comprise only about 10 percent of the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims.

iceman

He was definitely known. So known that even some iraqis openly celebrated his death and oppressed syrians handed out sweets upon learning of his demise. I'm sorry you didn't know him but you aren't exactly the most aware person. The sunni world is happy about the death of this sectarian shia oppressor.

The protests against the Iranian regime had far more people lol. The protests in Iraq against the government had far more people. Who you trying to fool man?

If you think this terrorist doesn't need defending then go make an account on shiachat and tell them to stop wasting their time.

His job was to deal with threats outside Iran. Those that are a threat to Iranians when traveling or living abroad. Or those who kill Shias or believe in their killing. And these are the ruthless and brutal Sunni militants and militias. 😊

iceman

Because Pakistani leaders don't care about who is evil and who is not. They care about their own worldly interests. For example China has 100,000s of Muslims locked up, yet Pakistan calls it it's 'iron brother'. So quite clearly Pakistan does not choose who to work with by looking at whether they are good or evil.

Even whilst going along with sunni-shia neutrality, the Pakistani military still provides ex-serviceman for Bahrain even though it knows that the Bahrain government will use them to crackdown on rebelling shias. It doesn't do it because it has joined up sunnis but rather again because it just meets Pakistani interests.

But worry not though, over this past year there has been a sharp increase of anti-Iran sentiment in Pakistan and Pakistani authorities have launched a crackdown on shia who work for Iran as target killers or serve it in other bad roles. So there have been improvements made in this direction. May Allah (swt) grant Pakistan a strong and religious sunni ruler.

"China has 100,000s of Muslims locked up, yet Pakistan calls it it's 'iron brother"

And what about Saudi Arabia and other Muslim countries 😊

"launched a crackdown on shia who work for Iran as target killers or serve it in other bad roles"

Those who have been killing Shias constantly, well Shias will have to protect themselves at the end. 😊 You can't blame Shias for retaliating and taking on Sunni extremists, Sunni cold blood killers. 😊

Over 1,900 Shias (including Hazaras and Ismailis) were killed in bomb blasts or targeted gun attacks from 2012 to May 2015 alone. The violence has claimed lives of thousands of men, women and children. Shia make up 20% of the Muslim population in Pakistan.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 02:04:45 AM by iceman »

iceman

Shia Muslims have been killed in large numbers by ISIL. On 12 June 2014, ISIL killed 1,700 unarmed Shia Iraqi Army cadet recruits in the Camp Speicher massacre. ISIL has also targeted Shia prisoners. According to witnesses, after the militant group took the city of Mosul, they divided the Sunni prisoners from the Shia prisoners. Up to 670 Shia prisoners were then taken to another location and executed. Kurdish officials in Erbil reported on the incident of Sunni and Shia prisoners being separated and Shia prisoners being killed after the Mosul prison fell to ISIL.

Amnesty International has held ISIL responsible for the ethnic cleansing of ethnic and religious minority groups in northern Iraq (Christians and Yezidis) on a "historic scale", putting entire communities "at risk of being wiped off the map of Iraq". In a special report released on 2 September 2014, it described how ISIL had "systematically targeted non-Sunni Muslim communities, killing or abducting hundreds, possibly thousands, of individuals and forcing more than tens of thousands of Shias, Sunnis, along with other minorities to flee the areas it has captured since 10 June 2014". The most targeted Shia groups in Nineveh Governorate were Shia Turkmens and Shabak, who have lived together for centuries in Nineveh, large parts of which came under ISIL's control from mid-2014 to late 2017.

iceman

Because Pakistani leaders don't care about who is evil and who is not. They care about their own worldly interests. For example China has 100,000s of Muslims locked up, yet Pakistan calls it it's 'iron brother'. So quite clearly Pakistan does not choose who to work with by looking at whether they are good or evil.

Even whilst going along with sunni-shia neutrality, the Pakistani military still provides ex-serviceman for Bahrain even though it knows that the Bahrain government will use them to crackdown on rebelling shias. It doesn't do it because it has joined up sunnis but rather again because it just meets Pakistani interests.

But worry not though, over this past year there has been a sharp increase of anti-Iran sentiment in Pakistan and Pakistani authorities have launched a crackdown on shia who work for Iran as target killers or serve it in other bad roles. So there have been improvements made in this direction. May Allah (swt) grant Pakistan a strong and religious sunni ruler.

"For example China has 100,000s of Muslims locked up, yet Pakistan calls it it's 'iron brother"

How many Muslim countries are there, what, 45 to 50. And all you see is Pakistan and Iran over the China and it's Muslims issue. 😊 What about the rest who are Sunni governed 😆

Adil

You're a time waster ice man and I'm not falling for your whataboutery. You bring up pakistan and then ask why I'm always talking about pakistan. Troll.

Rationalist

"If you read the 12er Shia book, their main enemies are those who follow the leaders of Saqifa"

And which book is that. How many Shias have read and followed it. Well what ever is in that book.
The 12er Shia books say Abi Bakr and Umar are Pharaoh and Hamaan. There is a narration about this where the Imam you number 6 says he is Rafidah and add that being a Rafidah is same as opposing the Pharaoh. 

Quote
They use the concept of unity because that's what they truly believe in. It doesn't matter what they do, since you're wearing negative spectacles so that's how you're going to see it.
The people who call on unity also say the  oppression and hatred toward the 12er Shia madhab links back to Saqifa. Are you going to deny this?

Quote
The hatred for Shias is clearly in your books throughout history. And that's how you've been raised. So no expectations of difference in thinking or positive change from your side.
Yes, it is. I am not going to deny that. 12er Shia have been massacred throughout history. Their history of persecution resembles that of the Jews. However, in reaction the 12er Shia also became takfiri and attributed takfiri views toward the Imams. The difference our views are based on fatwas from people who hate 12er Shia. On the contrary, the Takfiri views of the 12er Shia are attributed to the Imams.


Quote
And that's how you've been raised.
This is false. I have been on shiachat since 2004, and then finally they banned in 2010 because I began to expose the takfiri view of their zakirs. Then I also interacted with many 12er Shia after that. When you don't fall for their traps and they realize you won't accept their dawah they also become hostile toward you.  Before 2003, the 12er Shia rarely existed for me. All I was grew up learning about the 12er Shia is they curse the sahaba, the regret what happened in Karbala etc. In fact, before 2003 I didn't get much interaction. Then I joined shiachat in 2004, and  I listened to many unity lectures that were programmed for dawah. However, when you listen closely you will see that there is a massive hate toward Sunni Islam (ie Abi Bakr and Umar). The 12er Shia believe Abi Bakr and Umar reasons for today's problems.  Some even went as far as saying the 12th imam will go their graves and deal with them. 


Quote
"Iran has been more focused and involved in trying to take down ahle sunnah"
Yes the supreme leader made a fatwa on not cursing the sahaba. Islamic Pulse talked about this, but he still believes Umar killed Fatima.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2020, 04:54:30 AM by Rationalist »

Mythbuster1


Pakistan’s Chief of Army Staff Gen. Qamar Javed Bajwa paid an unusual, “historic” visit to Tehran. The general, with numerous medals adorning his dress uniform, embraced the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps and declared that he had come to Iran in part to learn how to build and deploy volunteer militias like Iran’s Basij in his own country. The two countries also have shared economic interests, like the gas pipeline that’s supposed to run from Iran to India via Pakistan and the Russian oil pipeline that’s slated to follow a similar route.

That’s news to me is that, I know bajwa went to Iran but not to learn about volunteer militias, we used Afghanistan for that we don’t need learning from others.

Please DO provide your sources.......otherwise your just spitting garbage.

Mythbuster1


One could pose a similar question to Riyadh about its close ties with Turkey, another economic and strategic ally of Tehran. Two years ago, Turkey joined Saudi Arabia’s Sunni alliance (after initially being ostracized by it) without being required to sever its ties with Iran – something Riyadh has demanded of Qatar, though not of the United Arab Emirates, whose trade with Iran is even more extensive. Evidently, the Saudis recognize the limits of their war against Iran.

Erm.....if my memory serves me right Turkey got pressured by Russia otherwise they still want the dog Bashar gone.
Turkey is no ally of Iran........where do you get all this tripe from?

https://ahvalnews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/ahvalnews.com/iran-turkey/turkey-iran-covert-war-seven-years-columnist?amp

It’s politics they will never befriend Iran.

Go do some real research and provide evidence for your ideas and notions.

Mythbuster1

His job was to deal with threats outside Iran. Those that are a threat to Iranians when traveling or living abroad. Or those who kill Shias or believe in their killing. And these are the ruthless and brutal Sunni militants and militias. 😊

He was a ruthless and brutal militant too...... go ask the Sunnis who are celebrating with sweets in Syria.

Stop vouching for terrorists and making excuses for them he deserved what he got.


iceman

You're a time waster ice man and I'm not falling for your whataboutery. You bring up pakistan and then ask why I'm always talking about pakistan. Troll.

I know you hate facts. 😊

iceman

He was a ruthless and brutal militant too...... go ask the Sunnis who are celebrating with sweets in Syria.

Stop vouching for terrorists and making excuses for them he deserved what he got.

He helped defeat ISIS and other militant groups and militias. I know those groups were Sunnis. But they were a global threat to all. Those Sunnis that you so dearly speak of had a monstrous ideology and was an absolute threat to mankind let alone Shias and Sunnis. He was no terrorist and certainly wasn't labelled as a terrorist. Trump is a business man. He has no knowledge of politics and how to run a country.

iceman

Erm.....if my memory serves me right Turkey got pressured by Russia otherwise they still want the dog Bashar gone.
Turkey is no ally of Iran........where do you get all this tripe from?

https://ahvalnews-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/ahvalnews.com/iran-turkey/turkey-iran-covert-war-seven-years-columnist?amp

It’s politics they will never befriend Iran.

Go do some real research and provide evidence for your ideas and notions.

A post without sarcasm and silly smiley faces, you've certainly changed. What happened to you. 😊

 

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